Chat Software
About Us
Services Services
PMTI Packages PMTI Packages
Tourist Destinations Tourist Destinations
How We Do It How We Do It
Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions
Contact Us Contact Us

Orthopedic

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

  1. Total / Partial Knee Replacement
  2. Total / Partial Knee Replacement Total / Partial Hip Replacement
  3. Total / Partial Knee Replacement Carpal Tunnel  Decompression

1.  Total / Partial Knee Replacement

Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to be more active. When performing simple activities, such as walking or climbing stairs, becomes too difficult, and medications no longer help, you may want to consider knee replacement surgery.

When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from the surface of your knee joint and replaces them with a man-made surface of metal and plastic. In a partial knee replacement, the surgeon only replaces one part of your knee joint. The surgery can cause scarring, blood clots and, rarely, infections. After a knee replacement, you will no longer be able to do certain activities, such as jogging and high-impact sports.

Procedure

The procedure itself takes approximately 2 hours under general or spinal anesthesia. Your surgeon will remove the damaged cartilage and bone and then position the new metal and plastic joint surfaces to restore the alignment and function of your knee.

There are many different types of artificial knees, nearly all of which consist of three components: the femoral component (made of a highly polished strong metal), the tibial component (made of a durable plastic often held in a metal tray), and the patellar component (also plastic).

Procedure

You will have a general or spinal anaesthetic. A cut is made about 8 inches long down the front of your knee. The damaged surfaces of the lower end of your thigh bone and the upper end of your shin bone are removed. These are replaced with an artificial joint. The skin is then closed up with stitches or clips. You will have to stay in the hospital for about 7 to 10 days following your operation. You may go home when you can walk safely with crutches or sticks. It must be remembered that the aim of this operation is to stop the pain in your knee.  

After your operation, you should be able to bend your knee from fully straight to a right angle. As a result you will be able to walk further and climb stairs more easily. Any deformities such as being knock-kneed may be corrected with this procedure. All infections should be cleared before having this  procedure as the infection may spread to your new knee.

After - In Hospital

Your knee will be wrapped in a bulky bandage. There may be a fine plastic drainage tube running from the wound. This is to drain any residual blood from the operation. You may have a knee support on your leg to keep it still when you are not doing your exercises. The wound may be painful but medications will be given to control this.

The discomfort of the operation can make it difficult to pass urine and empty the bladder. It is important that your bladder does not seize up completely. The wound will have a simple adhesive dressing over it. The wound drain will be pulled out a day or two after the operation. Your stitches will be taken out 10 to 12 days after the operation. Wash around the dressing for the first 10 days. You can wash the wound area as soon as the dressing has been removed with soap and warm tap water. Once the wound has healed, a shower or bath is permissible.

After - At Home
When you go home, you will be able to move around the house and manage stairs.  Your knee will continue to improve for at least six months. You must not drive for two months after you leave hospital. How soon you can return to work depends on your job. If you can get to work without driving yourself or by using public transport you may be able to return to work six weeks after your operation. You should not do manual work after a total knee replacement.

< Back to top >


2.Total / Partial Hip Replacement

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint. The round head of the thighbone (femur) moves inside the hollow socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis. This is what allows your leg to swing easily from your hip. When the surfaces of the ball-and-socket joint between your thigh bone and pelvis bone are no longer smooth, and the surfaces of the bone are rough and the cartilage lining have eroded, you feel pain and stiffness in your hip and may opt for hip replacement surgery.

A total hip replacement implant has three parts: the stem, which fits into the femur and provides stability; the ball, which replaces the spherical head of the femur; and the cup, which replaces the worn-out hip socket.

If only one part of the joint is damaged or diseased, a partial hip replacement may be recommended. In most cases, the pelvic socket is left intact and the head of the femur is replaced, using a component similar to those of a total hip replacement. Another option uses a device resembling a half circle which fits over the head of the femur so that it need not be replaced. This is fixed to the femur with cement around the femoral head and has a short stem that passes into the femoral neck

Procedure

You will be given a general or spinal anesthesia and a cut about 10 inches long is made along the side of your hip and thigh. The damaged bone ends are removed and replaced with an artificial joint.  The stem is fixed into your thigh bone and the new socket into the space in your pelvis. The skin is then closed with stitches or clips.
It must be remembered that the aim of this operation is to stop the pain in the hip. The range of movement in your hip may or may not improve very much but the pain should disappear.  Because there is no pain, you will be able to walk further and climb stairs more easily.  All infections should be cleared before having this  procedure as the infection may spread to your new hip.

After - In Hospital

You may have a fine plastic drainage tube coming out of the skin near the wound, connected to a container. This is to drain any residual blood from the operation. Your legs may be held apart by a special pillow. This is to prevent you from crossing your legs, which may make the new ball slip out of the new socket and dislocate your new hip. The wound may be painful but you will be given medicine to control this.  For the first six weeks, you must be very careful not to do things that may dislocate the new hip joint.

The wound will probably have a simple adhesive dressing over it. The wound drain will be pulled out 1 to 2 days after your operation. Your stitches or clips will be taken out about 12 days after the operation. You will be in hospital for 7 to 10 days following your operation depending on your circumstances. You may go home when you can walk safely with crutches or sticks.

After - At Home

You will be able to move around the house and manage stairs. Your hip will continue to improve for at least six months. At home, it is advisable to sleep on your back for six weeks. If you must sleep on your side, sleep on your operated side with a pillow between your legs. Lie on the side that has been operated upon. You will not be able to drive for six weeks after your operation. How soon you can return to work depends on your job. If you mainly sit at work, you may be able to return to work three to four weeks after your operation. This also depends on your being able to get to work. You should not do manual work after a total hip replacement.

< Back to top >

3.  Carpal Tunnel Decompression

A nerve to your finger ends runs deep inside a little tunnel (carpal tunnel) in the front of your wrist. When there is not enough room for the nerve as it runs through the carpal tunnel, it causes pain and tingling in the fingers and hand, and even higher up the forearm.

Procedure

A cut is made in your palm, next to the skin crease that runs up the centre. The roof of the tunnel is then cut to give your nerve more space. The wound is then closed up with stitches or clips. Local or general anesthesia may be used.  You may go home an hour or two following the operation.

After - In Hospital

Usually the wound is pain-free. You may feel some discomfort. Your hand will be in a bulky bandage when you go home. Your arm will be in a sling to reduce any swelling. The sling should be worn for the first 24 hours or so after your operation. The bandage and stitches will be taken out about 10-12 days after the operation. You will not need a dressing on the wound after that. You may wash around the bandage for the first 10 days. The wound area may be washed with soap and warm tap water as soon as the dressing has been removed. Once the wound has healed, you may shower or bathe.

After - At Home

Rest is recommended once you get home.  The second day after the operation, you should be reasonably comfortable. You must exercise your fingers by moving them for five minutes every hour.  You cannot drive whileyour hand is in the bandage. How soon you can return to work depends on your job. If you can work one handed, you may be able to return to work two or three days after your operation. This also depends on you being able to get to work. If your job is manual you will be unable to work for six weeks. Your nerve pain and the pins and needles at night should disappear after your operation.

< Back to top >